(no subject)

Sep. 20th, 2017 08:42 am
camwyn: Me in a bomber jacket and jeans standing next to a green two-man North Andover Flight Academy helicopter. (Default)
[personal profile] camwyn
Confession time: I had been kind of almost sorta hoping Jose would be a little stronger this morning so I could work from home. I am aware, yes, that even if the storm had been stronger, my area would not have born the brunt of it and other people whose livelihoods and homes depend on the ocean's weather not killing them would have been badly hurt. I am also aware that I used to work for the Red Cross and would feel obligated to join one of the local chapters in any relief efforts to this area should such a storm strike occur even though I haven't been a member in years.

Every so often there are areas in which I cannot help but consider myself a little bit of a terrible human being, and rooting for extreme weather even though I know I am not the one who is going to pay the consequences is one of those areas, and I am very sorry.

Age of Rusty Reviews

Sep. 18th, 2017 07:37 pm
bluegargantua: (Default)
[personal profile] bluegargantua

Hey,

   I managed to pick up the pace on my reading so it hasn't been a month since the last review!

  First up Age of Assassins by RJ Barker.  As I've said, I prefer my heroes a bit on the older side these days because I am and I enjoy reading about characters who aren't driven by teenage emotions.  You Die When You Die was a pretty good book but the teenaged protagonist was a chore to read sometimes.  That said, here we are with another book about a young teenager trying to figure out this grown-up thing.  This is complicated by the fact that he's being raised and trained by Merela, a professional assassin.

  The book's setting has a Dark Sun vibe, people can use magic but it draws on life force so if you want to do a big magical spell, you can, but a huge section of land will become barren and lifeless.  Luckily, you can reverse that.  Unluckily, you reverse it by spilling blood onto the "sourlands" magic leaves behind.  So there's a pogrom out for people talented in magic and pretty rough existence for everyone else.

  Girton, our hero, and his master infiltrate a castle on a mysterious mission.  The mysterious mission is a set-up.  The local queen needs an assassin to prevent another assassin from killing her son.  The queen has plans for her son to take over not just the local kingdom but to marry into the High King's family and take over from there.  The son is a jerk and not terribly popular and the grandson of the previously deposed king is around.  So there's intrigue aplenty.

  Girton, of course, is just an apprentice so he winds up doing a lot of grunt work and even when he finds the important clues, he doesn't realize it until Merela puts it together.  That's not to say he's stupid or incompetent (he doesn't kill without reason, but he does kill), just that he's a teenager and there's a lot he still doesn't know.  It's a bit like a Nero Wolfe mystery in which Archie does a ton of running around and then Nero just looks up from his chair and tells you the solution.

  All in all, it was an ok book.  I'm curious to try the next one in the series, but I wasn't super blown away by it.  Certainly a good source for plots in a LARP or RPG.

  Next I read Sea of Rust by C. Robert Cargill and it's probably one of the better books of fiction I've read this year.  Not terribly literary, but It really sucked me in and held my attention with good characters, dialog, world-building, pacing, and even the deeper themes it touches on.

  In this book, the robots rose up and killed all of mankind (and most of the life on the planet).  The story follows Brittle, a service robot who used to work for humans and now scours the Sea of Rust, the upper Midwest of the US where the freebots try and eke out a living.  Freebots?  Oh yes, because after the robot uprising, the giant mainframe AIs said "download yourself to our servers and let us use your body.  join the One. resistance is futile".  For the most part, resistance has been pretty futile and robots who don't want to be part of one of the major mainframes are out in places like the Sea of Rust trying to keep their heads down and keep a supply of spare parts handy.

  Brittle does a lot of this -- she follows malfunctioning bots out into the wild and when they shut down, she loots them for parts -- either parts she needs or parts she can trade to get what she wants.  Coming home from a successful mission, she gets ambushed.  She survives but gets injured in the process and now she needs to secure a new core for her model or she'll go mental as well.  About this time one of the mainframes makes a major push into the Sea of Rust.

  The book alternates a bit between Brittle's narrative about what's going on and Brittle describing the rise of the AIs and their overthrow of the humans.  That sometimes annoys me (it seems like your padding the page count), but it was pretty well done here.  Although the book plays out like a robot Western or Noir, there are quieter moments where robots probe interesting philosophical questions that lead you down very different and very similar paths when your a robot and not a biological being.  Oh, and yeah, Brittle is a she and why that is so is one of the interesting questions they deal with.

  It was a solid book and I highly recommend it.

later
Tom

silveraspen: inara crying (firefly: some days aren't worth it)
[personal profile] silveraspen
Many of you know this already through other channels, but since I haven't said it here yet --

My father passed away due to complications from heart failure on August 25, 2017. I am very fortunate that I was able to be there with him when the time came, as was my mother; he didn't leave this world alone.

Since my mother was in ICU at the same time (in the same hospital, at least) and is still recovering, plus a few other things, we will be holding a memorial service for him sometime in November. That's what he wanted, anyway, rather than a big funeral shindig, so.

By then I will have better words to share here in his memory. For now -- I loved him very much, and he loved me. Even when we disagreed on things, that was always a constant. I am grateful to have had him in my life for as long as I did, and I will miss him always.



(Before you ask - no, I'm not okay, not really, but I'm getting through it one moment at a time. All of you have been a great help.)

(no subject)

Sep. 17th, 2017 11:23 pm
gramarye1971: Fakir looking up from a library book (Princess Tutu: Fakir)
[personal profile] gramarye1971
Still around and reading, just a bit quiet. Finishing my Remix Revival fic tapped out quite a bit of my creativity. And I keep starting and deleting entire screeds about the current state of North Korean politics and nuclear brinksmanship because I am a rank amateur when compared with the good folks in the disarmament business who can look at a missile for five seconds and say things like ah, yes, that's a second-generation Iranian-produced Scud-D model, only painted black and with extra fins added to it for no good reason that we can determine. I hate feeling only half-informed, if that.

At this point I am crossing off days until my folks swing down from the Frigid North to visit in mid-October, and to my planned Japan trip in mid-November. If anything else creative or similarly productive gets done during the interim, I'm not sure whether it'll be in spite of or because of my own efforts.

But still around and reading, as mentioned.
newredshoes: it's good to feel things you want (<3 | lust lust lust)
[personal profile] newredshoes
A rough decision: This afternoon, I saw an apartment in my dream location. It's literally exactly where I would want an apartment to be, right down to equidistance to my favorite things in the neighborhood. It's within my budget, it's pretty light-filled, it's in the back of the building (a brownstone!), so it should be quiet. I feel like I should be ecstatic.

But the more apartments I see (so many of them utter, utter stinkers!), the more I realize 1) how important having a non-miniscule kitchen is to me, and 2) how little I want to live in the exact same apartment I've lived in since college. This is a steep fourth-floor walkup with no particular amenities, a sloping (and unpretty) floor, bad caulking and a bizarre kitchen (there's a ledge acting as an island that divides it from the living-room area). Plus, no pets. I just have Betta Barnes right now, but I'm really sad any time I think of not having the opportunity to get a dog without moving.

I pretty much have a week to find a place I really like if (and this is still an "if") I plan on going to North Carolina to dogsit Gus while Dad and J are in Thailand. I have to give my management company 30 days' notice that I'm leaving, and honestly, my broker explained today that the most danger I'm in (if that ) is losing my security deposit (which obviously I don't want to lose, but it's also kind of ceased being real money in my head, since it's been out of my hands for three years???).

So, this is my big stress right now. Presumably any place I could sign on for would ask for an Oct. 1 move-in date, which will mean 1) paying rent on two places at once, but 2) the opportunity for a staggered, gradual move. I'm trying to focus on this for the moment, because more immediately, some condensation from a glass of iced tea dripped into my trackpad on Friday, and my laptop has been almost unusably haunted since. (Please let it go away, I don't want to have to buy a new computer too, especially since I don't like any of the new Macs and I'm locked into the dumb system.)

Okay, going to hit post. Hi, friends. I would love to be someplace new already!!!!

(no subject)

Sep. 16th, 2017 09:08 pm
skygiants: Beatrice from Much Ado putting up her hand to stop Benedick talking (no more than reason)
[personal profile] skygiants
If you are currently in Boston, you have one week left to go see Or at the Chelsea Theater! As [personal profile] aamcnamara put it on Twitter, "it is the Restoration queer bedroom farce spy writing-themed play of your dreams."

Or features three cast members, playing, respectively:
- former spy and ambitious playwright Aphra Behn
- Charles II of England and also Aphra Behn's ex-lover double agent William Scot
- Nell Gwyn, and also Aphra Behn's elderly and extremely cranky maid, and also in one memorably stamina-requiring and scene-stealing monologue Lady Mary Davenant, manager of the Duke's Company of theatrical players

Most of the play takes place in Aphra Behn's apartment, with cast members popping in and out of side rooms as Aphra Behn vainly attempts to keep all her love interests separate AND ALSO thwart a hypothetical plot on the king's life AND ALSO and most importantly finish writing the final act of her career-launching play by a deadline of 9 AM the next morning! Which nobody will let her do! Because they keep wanting to make out with her and/or tell her about plots on the king's life! It's all very frustrating!

The dialogue is delightful, the actors do a fantastic job rattling out natural-sounding rapid-fire iambic pentameter, I laughed aloud at the final plot twist, and the ending contains a solid dose of much-appreciated optimism; it's an extremely enjoyable experience and one I would strongly recommend.

(no subject)

Sep. 14th, 2017 06:16 pm
skygiants: Hikaru from Ouran walking straight into Tamaki's hand (talk to the hand)
[personal profile] skygiants
At first I expected to write a rather scathing post about Rachel Kadish's The Weight of Ink, and then I got like 2/3 of the way through and realized that there were in fact some things I really liked about the book to counteract the things that made me stare into the camera like I was on the office, and THEN I got to the end and -

-- ok let me backtrack. The Weight of Ink is a serious literary novel about a pair of academics (the favorite protagonists of serious literary novels) who have discovered a treasure trove of 17th-century documents in a staircase written by Ester Velasquez, a Portuguese Jewish woman who Confounded All Tradition by acting as scribe for a London rabbi. The book proceeds to interweave Ester's story and POV with that of the academics as they discover various bits of evidence pointing to the things that Rachel Kadish will then later explain to us in Ester's narrative sections.

Ester's story is .... it's mostly good? I think I have come around to largely thinking it's good. It starts to pick up around the middle of the book, when Ester starts writing letters to various famous philosophers under fake male names so that she can Engage in the Discourse.

[ACADEMIC A: [Ester's fake name] did not get much attention during his career or make any important allies -
ACADEMIC B: Oh, why is that?
ACADEMIC A: Well, basically, he was very rude to everyone he wrote to.

I will admit I was charmed.]

Ester's most important relationships are with the rabbi -- a good and wise man who respects her intellect and cannot support the ways in which she chooses to use it -- and with Rivka, the rabbi's housekeeper, a Polish Jew who acts as Ester's foil in a number of significant ways, not all of them obvious or expected. Both of these dynamics have an interesting and complicated tension to them that goes well beyond the standard 'I, A Misunderstood Woman Ahead Of My Time.'

Also there is another young upper-class Jewish woman who is rebellious in wildly different ways than Ester is; a pair of brothers who are both interested in marrying Ester for profoundly different reasons, neither of which is true love; and, for a brief period of time, a love interest. The love interest is hilariously lacking in personality and equally hilariously irrelevant to Ester's life on the whole, and mostly exists to trigger a series of philosophical musings related to desire about which Ester can fight with Spinoza. I guess The Distant Shadow Of Spinoza is also one of Ester's most significant relationships.

Anyway, I appreciate the weighting of these relationships, and the way in which the narrative emphasis shifted from what I expected, and especially all the relationships that were not grounded in romance, but in other forms of love and duty and resentment and complicated emotional bonds.

And ... then there's our modern academics.

Helen Watt is a stiff-necked elderly British specialist in Jewish history, who is on the verge of retirement due to Parkinson's disease. Helen has a Tragic Backstory: in her youth, she spent a month as a volunteer in Israel in the 1950s and had a summer fling. Sorry, let me rephrase: she met an Israeli soldier who was the love! of her life!! (For a month.)

The pivotal scene in their romance occurs when Helen shows up for one of their few actual shared off days to have a date, and he hands her a copy of The History of the Jewish People and then LEAVES and REFUSES TO COME BACK until she's READ IT COVER TO COVER. This is the only way she can understand our endless, endless oppression!

(Meanwhile, he lurks outside, and periodically brings her snacks. THIS SCENE IS SOMEHOW NOT MEANT TO BE COMIC.)

Alas, Young Helen in her frailty decides it's all a LITTLE too much for her, and subsequently regrets her lost love until the end of her days. But, inspired by the world's weirdest date, she decides to dedicate her life to the study of Jewish history, so I guess ... that's all right .....?

She is assisted in her endeavors by Aaron, the third POV character. Aaron is an insufferable American Jewish Ph.D. student. He is working on a dissertation about Shakespeare and the Jews, for which he has no evidence, so instead he spends the entire book obsessing over an unattainable Cool Girl. (And she is so textbook Cool Girl! The coolest girl of all! A girl who poses nude for artists who capture a certain something about her, a girl who's just realer than other girls, THE MAGICAL IDEAL.) He sends her incredibly long, pompous emails after a one-night stand which took place on an evening in which "he waited until Marisa was on her second beer -- he kept track from a distance, biding his time. When he approached at last, his own untouched beer dangling casually in his hand --" OKAY AARON, THANKS AND GOODBYE, YOU AND I ARE DONE.

But alas, we are not done with Aaron, we are not done with Aaron at all. Eventually Aaron does come to realize that he's insufferable! A significant part of this realization comes when he visits an archive and meets a shy, demure archivist who's bad at flirting, and is suddenly struck by how desperately sad it is that people like her may never find love because they're all overlooked by assholes like him. If only people like him paid attention to people like her, their lives might be fulfilling and the world would be better! ALAS.

(There are two other archivists in the book, The Interchangeable Patricias. They have a few moments of heroically rising to Helen's aid but mostly their role is to stand as icily competent, largely humorless glowering gate-guards over the sacred text, because of course.)

So basically everything about the modern sections was nonsense to me. (Also, I got mad every time they found a document that explained to them a Piece of the Mystery in a way that was way too narratively convenient. 'Oh, look, Ester doodled out her real name and her fake name next to each other and added a note that said 'HEY IT'S ALL MY NAMES!' Isn't that handy!')

Still, Ester's story in and of itself was good and compelling and interesting, and grudgingly I became invested in it despite myself...

And then spoilers! )
newredshoes: sign: what's stopping you (<3 | what's stopping you?)
[personal profile] newredshoes
Nothing clarifies one's determination to move out, even if the space and the neighborhood are nice (well, certainly the neighborhood), like spotting Violent Neighbor's husband lingering on the sidewalk in front of the building, talking in a hangdog way with someone clearly blocking the main entrance. I spent 45 minutes sitting on a park bench rather than chance running that particular gauntlet. And weirdly, no one should have to live being scared of that, even if nothing was happening!!! So this evening I've been on the phone and corresponding with varying brokers and agents about no-fee one-bedrooms that are vastly out of my comfort zone financially but which score well on RentLogic, look nice on the inside, have some amenities (a dishwasher!!! A FEW IN-UNIT W/Ds!!!!) and seem to be in interesting neighborhoods. My weekend is quickly getting silly, but shoot, it will definitely be worth it.

In other news, I finally remembered today that when one has an ongoing low-grade cold that doesn't go away with sleep or soup, you can actually just buy cold medicine and it will help a lot.

(no subject)

Sep. 13th, 2017 10:38 pm
skygiants: Sheska from Fullmetal Alchemist with her head on a pile of books (ded from book)
[personal profile] skygiants
Juliet Takes a Breath was our book club book for the month of August. I am glad for the existence of this book in the world and I am glad I read it, and with that said my experience of reading it was largely one of OVERWHELMING CONTACT EMBARRASSMENT.

Juliet Takes a Breath is the coming-of-age story of Juliet Milagros Palante, a young Puerto Rican lesbian from the Bronx who's spending the summer of 2002 interning in Portland, Oregon! with international feminist sensation Harlowe Brisbane! author of "Raging Flower," a book about VAGINA POWER!

Unsurprisingly, pretty much every time Harlowe Brisbane spoke a sentence I wanted to retract my head all the way back inside my nonexistent turtle shell until a million years had passed and womyn power white lady feminism was a thing that could be discussed with distant scholarly complacency, like galvanism or the Cathar heresy. This is completely expected and indeed clearly intended by the book, but nonetheless, OH LORD.

Anyway, not everything is Harlowe Brisbane being exactly the way you'd expect; a great deal of the book is Juliet dealing with a wide range of family reactions to her coming-out (the width of the range in particular is really good!), and Learning New Vocabularies, and finding comfortable queer POC spaces, and attending lectures about intersectional solidarity in the wake of 9/11, and making romantic gay teen mixtapes full of Ani DiFranco songs! But oh, lord. At least one book club member said it rang extremely true to their experience and memories of Portland in 2002. Myself, in 2002 I was nowhere near Portland nor any of the Cool Yet Problematique gay spaces that Rivera is writing about here and it's PROBABLY just as well, but it does seem quite likely to me that walking around Portland in 2002 was a lot like walking around a physical manifestation of certain bits of tumblr, and that is indeed the sense I got of it from this book.

[a sidenote: the acknowledgments in the back include pointed thanks and reference to the time that the author spent with Inga Muscio, author of 'Cunt: A Declaration of Independence.' I'm not necessarily saying this book was a callout post, but .... anyway Inga Muscio also cheerfully blurbed the book on the front so it seems there were no hard feelings on her part and all is well.]

(no subject)

Sep. 12th, 2017 08:46 am
camwyn: Me in a bomber jacket and jeans standing next to a green two-man North Andover Flight Academy helicopter. (Default)
[personal profile] camwyn
Still here, I promise. Mostly been busy on Tumblr and working on jewelry stuff at night while watching a friend of mine slug their way through Mass Effect Andromeda for the first time. There has been a lot of bitching over sequence-breaking and the fact that this game is good when it could have been great, it's just bug laden/bad at pacing/etc.

Trying to avoid spoilers for the rest of the game; it's currently up to Kadara and a bunch of people's loyalty missions, fwiw.
newredshoes: midcentury modern swallow (<3 | circumnavigator)
[personal profile] newredshoes
Oh man oh man oh man -- I had a truly ridiculous apartment-hunting day. The first place I saw, in my neighborhood but on the other side of it, was gorgeous and gigantic and also in the same building as the guy I dated and then ghosted on last year. His name is still on the mailboxes, AUGH.

The place I just came back from... has an in-unit W/D, a dishwasher, new kitchen (with hiiiiideous floor tile, lol oh well), a good size, no vermin that I could find, decent light (no trees nearby and the view itself isn't great, but fixable if you go for lots of houseplants) and. AND. THE MOST AWESOME ROOFTOP IN BROOKLYN, MAYBE? You can legit see everything, it's great. Pets allowed, so I could actually get a dog!!! Something I said I'd do only if I had access to my own washer and dryer. It's catty-corner from the apartment I live in now, so it might actually be the world's easiest move. If I can give 30 days' notice this week and start this lease... maybe on Oct. 1, the move might be doable, like, over the course of two weeks, in shifts? This might work!

(There are things to be meh about -- the hallways could be a little cleaner, but the broker said that was due to the workers doing the remodel/repair/&c. The apartment is also as-is, so I'd have to negotiate a deep-clean on their dime, I think. But I'd be close to my CVS, my familiar train lines, my bike routes, my co-op membership... I'd be in an elevator building, I'd be free of my evil neighbors... I'd even still be close to my favorite cheap takeout place. I do still want to explore more of Brooklyn, but it's only becoming clearer to me that any nice place that has the neighborhood amenities I imagine for myself is out of my reach unless I get a roommate, and I don't totally know that I can do that.)

So... hey, that might be a thing that I'm okay with. Now to decide if I'll be applying for this assistant editor position at the Mary Sue (which, er, I haven't read in a dog's age)...

(no subject)

Sep. 10th, 2017 06:37 pm
skygiants: Katara from Avatar: the Last Airbender; text 'just kicked butt' (katara kicks butt)
[personal profile] skygiants
Code Name Pauline: Memoirs of a World War II Special Agent is a compilation of oral history interviews with Pearl Witherington Cornioley, behind-the-lines SOE agent in France during WWII, packaged up into a YA nonfiction narrative.

Pearl's story is as fascinating as all the other stories about WWII female secret agents I've read, with the bonus that it's barely crushingly depressing at all! Pearl started out as a courier, posing as a traveling cosmetics saleswoman and working with an old school friend of hers who was running the SOE Stationer network -

(sidenote; she'd also been the one to recommend that her old school friend sign up for secret intelligence to begin with, and then was like 'yes now that I've set that up I'll pop on over to join his network now, thanks')

(sidenote 2; she'd also managed to somehow smuggle a secret message to her fiance Henri, a French soldier who had just escaped from German POW camp, and get him in contact with the Stationer network as well, so literally as soon as she parachuted in her boss was like "HEY WELCOME TO FRANCE HERE'S YOUR BOYFRIEND I'll just .... leave you two alone a bit")

- but eventually her boss was arrested by the Gestapo. Fortunately, Pearl had dragged several other members of the network out for a picnic that day, so they all escaped!

Then D-Day happened and Pearl was like "well, I guess it is now my job to be in charge of organizing all British supply drops and getting weapons and money to the French underground resistance, and no one else seems to be sabotaging the Germans around here, so ..... I guess that's what we're doing now?"

And that's how Pearl ended up being in charge of several thousand Maquis soldiers! With Henri playing support.

(There's a couple of Henri interviews in the back and they are mostly taken up with the story of how he rescued a baby bunny while retreating from the Germans and brought it along with him through numerous battles until they were about to be captured, at which point he was like 'FLY FREE, MY RABBIT FRIEND! SAVE YOURSELF!' "And that was the only life I saved during the war." BLESS.

There's also a very cute bit that the interviewers put in dialogue, because they also obviously found it super cute, where Pearl is like "ugh I get so mad when people say the men followed me because I was pretty" and Henri is like "BUT YOU WERE, YOU WERE SO PRETTY" and Pearl is like "I WAS NOT AND ALSO THAT'S NOT THE POINT.")

I have not yet managed to get my hands on Nancy Wake's autobiography, but I would love to compare/contrast -- they played very similar roles during the war in organizing Maquis during the liberation of France, but while Nancy Wake seems to have made no bones about being a very front-lines combatant (strangling soldiers with her bare hands, etc.) Pearl spends a lot of time in her account strongly disclaiming active heroism and emphasizing the logistics and support elements of her role. Could she have killed somebody herself if she had to? Well, gosh, she's so glad she never had to find out, that wasn't her job at all!

But I mean, Pearl also starts out early on in her narrative explaining that she is very conflict-averse and dislikes argument above all things, and then goes on to describe, in addition to extensive amounts of fighting with the Germans:

- fighting with the entire French government when it looked like they weren't going to give any of her Maquis any medals because they were technically working under the British rather than the French (ง'̀-'́)ง
- fighting with the entire English government when they tried to give her a civil Order of the British Empire rather than a military one because "there was nothing remotely 'civil' about what I did" (ง'̀-'́)ง
- fighting with the head of SOE after he accused a trusted French colleague of hers of being a double agent due to a misunderstanding and then failed to apologize -- "as Colonel Buckmaster is kind enough to visit me each time I come to Paris, can you ask him to alert me next time and I'll ask [the dude who was falsely accused] to come too?" (ง'̀-'́)ง (AND HER OLD BOSS NEVER VISITED HER AGAIN)
- fighting yet again with the English government when they wouldn't let her wear parachute wings, because she'd only jumped four times instead of five, "SO I JUST WORE THEM ANYWAY" (ง'̀-'́)ง (the editor is like 'we don't know where or how she got a pair to wear? but apparently she did?')

What I'm saying is I take Pearl's description of her own retiring conflict-averse shyness with a grain of salt.

(no subject)

Sep. 10th, 2017 01:03 am
gramarye1971: a meteor-sized plum pudding slamming into Earth, from a cover of The Economist (Pudding)
[personal profile] gramarye1971
My Yuletide nominations for this year are Porco Rosso, Night Raid 1931, and Master Keaton. They're all finally available in English -- the last volume of Master Keaton goes on sale mid-September -- so perhaps this will be my year for rare history-based anime fandoms? I live in hope.

EDIT: I should admit that most of these nomination choices came about because at one point a few months ago I was seriously considering having an all-DPRK slate: the Inspector O novels, The Schoolgirl's Diary film, and the Squirrel and Hedgehog animated series. Much as I would enjoy writing or reading fic for any of these canons, I do not relish the thought of ending up on _coal at this time.

Oh no, wake up or go to sleep?

Sep. 9th, 2017 10:39 pm
newredshoes: it's good to feel things you want (<3 | lust lust lust)
[personal profile] newredshoes
Today's apartment-hunting apparently left me wiped enough for an early-evening nap, which I'll surely regret. Apartment-hunting is so lolzy. Like, we saw one place that used to be the parlor in a brownstone, and it was HUGE with GIGANTOR CEILINGS and VERY MOULDED CROWN MOULDINGS and a FIREPLACE and... a truly incredible amount of IKEA furniture left by the previous tenant. Then there was the building near Pratt (and the overpass) that was its own duplex -- you could go down an extremely tight spiral staircase and literally have your own garden-level cave the length of most of the building, with access to a tragic concrete patio and a half-built freestanding fire pit.

In 11 days, I have a haircut scheduled. I have no idea what to ask for, but I really would love to try something drastic and new. (I realized recently that in my eagerness for outward Major! Starting! Over! signs, hair could be a good intermediate step before, like, ink I still can't settle on.) I like longer hair because I can retro styles, in theory, but I so rarely actually do them -- usually I default to buns, although because my stylist loves long layers framing my face, I also generally have to deal with hair that hangs in my face and doesn't stay nicely put. Do I want short hair? An asymmetric bob? Does anyone have any suggestions? I have not been posting a lot of selfies, but this is my most recent one.

There is literally nothing on Netflix that I want to watch. (Last night I watched Woman in Gold, in which Helen Mirren and Tatiana Maslany play old/young versions of the same character, which is BRILLIANT CASTING and SUCH GOOD ACTING. It's about a Jewish Viennese woman trying to get back a Klimt portrait of her aunt stolen by the Nazis; the woman playing the aunt was elegant, beautiful, vivacious... and also the actress who was Faora in Man of Steel. The world is weird. The movie was also maybe the best film portrayal I've seen of the rights of Jews being taken away by Nazis? Like, it was so much about suddenly being marooned in the middle of all these ecstatic supporters, and it was so terrifying and really, really hit home.)

I accidentally bought a book/memoir yesterday about the three-way border of Greece, Bulgaria and Turkey, which was supposedly a far easier border crossing than the Berlin Wall. I am looking forward to this, but I have some other things to finish up first: I'm close to being done with Our Lady of the Ice, which is set in a domed Argentinian colony in Antarctica sometime in the early '60s. There are androids and gangsters and revolutionaries, it's pretty great. What else is there? Sleeping Giants, about a scientist who, when she was a little girl, fell into a hole in the ground and landed in a giant metal hand. There's also Laurus, a translated Russian novel about a saint who may be trying to get to Jerusalem and may also be traveling through time??? I keep saying I'm going to stop buying books and actually read/finish my stockpiles (I've been not finishing books lately, which is aggravating), especially since I plan on moving soon, but. But books. (If you want to read something amazing electronically, somehow I missed [personal profile] skygiants' novella "Suradanna and the Sea," which is about plucky immortal merchant seafarers and it is great.) All of which reminds me that I guess it's Yuletide nomination season again? Ay me.

Finally, one prediction model shows Hurricane Jose (the one after the one hitting Florida this weekend) possibly hitting New York. I feel it's incumbent on me to now point out, whenever someone brings up Chicago's weather, that at least it is extremely unlikely that it will ever experience a hurricane. #MidwestIsBest

Else, Inga and Grete

Sep. 6th, 2017 02:10 pm
newredshoes: Peggy in movie theater, looking innocent (cap | just like in the talkies)
[personal profile] newredshoes
Some Nice Links as I Clear Out My Tabs:
  • You guys know about Radiooooo, right? You can browse popular or weird music by decade and by country. I just started listening to the '40s station and it is something else. (For once, it's led me to the Kordt Sisters, the Danish Andrews or Boswell Sisters, and they're great!)
  • How to stop robocalls to your cell phone, omg omg, this is SUCH a problem for me.
  • The International Centre for Picture Book in Society's Migration Postcard Project
  • Please Move New Vilnius Convention Center Project AWAY From the Old Jewish Cemetery: As Belarus destroys Jewish cemeteries to build luxury condos (it's more complicated than that, but it's still infuriating), this is happening in Vilna, my mother's mother's family for centuries.
  • Another Lynda Barry syllabus, because I can't get enough of them.
  • omg, I have to know how the Wampanoag of Massachusetts ended up in Bermuda. (...oh. Oh, it was the usual.)
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